By Andrew Angus on January 25, 2011

Sarah Palin video goes viral – again.

Did you happen to catch the Sarah Palin video that went viral last week? 44 seconds of the woman breathing (it was pretty gross, actually). Here it is, if you really want to see it (watch Palin’s breath). And here’s Palin’s original video of her speech.

(Incidentally, the Sarah Palin ‘mouth breathing’ video has 1,187,650 views to date. Sarah’s live-action address? A paltry 13,199.)

In this world of 2-second sound bites, more and more politicians are trying to take charge of their online reputation by releasing their own videos via social media and the web. Personally, I think online video is a great way to communicate with an audience. But online video can work against politicians, especially when they represent themselves as a “talking head”.

Animated video vs. live-action video in the political arena.

We already know that video helps people remember a message better – 58% better, to be exact.
But animated video has the power to spark the imagination so much more than just plain live-action video.

Let’s say that Sarah Palin had decided to produce an animated video instead. She could have interspersed stats and charts to back up her point. She might have added photographs, illustrations or video of the memorial tribute to give her speech context. She would have engaged her viewers in a way that a ‘talking head’ can never do. Most importantly, her viewers would have retained more of her message.

And there’s the fact that it would have been a lot harder to make fun of her.

Of course, working for Switch Video, one of the world’s most prolific producers of animated videos for the web, I may be just a little biased. But biased or not – here’s some advice, Sarah.

Don’t set yourself up as such an easy target – next time, just make an animated video! Your viewers will thank you for it by actually watching your entire video and remembering more of it. They’ll hear your message. And they’ll most certainly be less inclined to chop it up into bite-size segments of you “mouth breathing.”

 

Want to know how video can help you?

Comments are closed.